How To Safely Dispose Of Rx Drugs

According to the White House Drug Policy Office, prescription drug abuse among 18 – to 25-year-olds rose 17 percent from 2002 to 2005. In 2004 and again in 2005, there were more new abusers of prescription drugs than new users of any illicit drug.

Young people mistakenly believe prescription drugs are safer than street drugs, doctors say. But accidental prescription drug deaths are rising and students who abuse pills are more likely to drive fast, binge-drink and engage in other dangerous behaviors. Parents should be alert to these signs and changes in behavior.

Al Gore III’s arrest may raise awareness among parents, said Dr. Donald Misch, director of health services at Northwestern University in Evanston. “This is an opportunity for people to understand this is happening in your household,” he said. “These are your kids. The drug dealers they’re going to are their doctors, their parents and their friends.”

Parents should clean out their medicine cabinets and lock up any prescription medications. This is more than likely customary in homes with toddlers but is advisable no matter the age of the child, just to be safe. This would also prohibit giving them to friends if your child isn’t a user.

Deputy drug czar, Scott Burns stated: “We found in focus groups of young people across the country that in large measure they’re getting the drugs from their own medicine cabinets and the Internet. Some Web pharmacies deliver ordered drugs without legitimate prescriptions, but other sites steal credit card information and never fill orders, Burns said.

With the rise in prescription drug abuse, three federal agencies issued guidelines earlier this year for disposing of medications without harming the environment.

1. Remove unused, unneeded or expired prescription drugs from their original containers.

2. Mix prescription drugs with an undesirable substance, like used coffee grounds or cat litter, and put them in impermeable, nondescript containers, such as empty cans or sealable bags.

3. Throw containers in the trash.

4. Don’t flush prescription drugs down the toilet unless the accompanying patient information says specifically it is safe to do so.

5. Return drugs to pharmaceutical take-back sites that allow consumers to return unused drugs for safe disposal.

Sources: White House Office of National Drug Control Policy, Department of Health and Human Services, Environmental Protection Agency.

Author’s Note: A pharmaceutical sales representative can increase sales by volunteering to return expired or outdated medications for the wholesalers in their territory. This can be a daunting task for their employees. Offering customer service at this level is rare and not expected. This also gives the drug rep an idea of the inventory on hand and an opportunity to help sell their medications. The wholesaler can offer specials to the retail drug stores on your proprietary pharmaceuticals.

Perhaps Drug Rehab Slipped Her Mind?

An Australian member of parliament has called for the children of drug addicts to be permanently removed from their parents and offered for adoption. Liberal MP Bronwyn Bishop wants to see adoption, rather than fostering, used to separate children from parents who are battling addiction. Excuse me, but has the honorable member completely forgotten about successful drug rehab programs?

Ms. Bishop, who is currently chairing an Australian parliamentary inquiry into the impact of illicit drug use on families, told the Australian Broadcasting Company’s Four Corners program that the current system is skewed towards the interests of drug-using parents, and not their children. She said there are hundreds of parents who are desperate to adopt children and give them love and good homes, but “there is this ‘biology first’ principle.”

By ignoring that successful drug rehab can keep a family together, and tossing “this biology first principle” on the trash heap, Ms. Bishop nullifies both the proven breakthroughs in the science of drug rehab, as well as one of the most primal urges of human history and experience – the urge for one’s own biological parents, and children.

Ms. Bishop’s detractors have been quick to speak up. Brisbane Youth Service spokeswoman Amanda Davies said there is no evidence that all people that use drugs are unable to parent their children. And Queensland Council of Social Service president Karyn Walsh said there is strong evidence that forced removals cause children long-term harm. “You can’t just go removing children simply because their parents have a drug addiction,” she said. “Children need to know their parents, and not all parents who have a drug addiction are bad parents, or incapable of parenting.”

Victorian Child Safety Commissioner Bernie Geary put it best when he said, “There is nothing in my experience worse than a child who’s sentenced to be without their parents for the rest of their lives. Children are better off with families in the long run.”

And let’s not forget the ultimate solution: if the parents do a successful drug rehab program that gets down to the bottom of why they’re taking drugs and resolves those issues, they won’t be addicts.

Itchy Male Organ Etiquette: When to Scratch

Emily Post may have literally written the book on etiquette in America, but it’s a safe bet that there’s at least one area she didn’t cover: when is it appropriate for a man to scratch his itchy male organ. She also most assuredly did not address the underlying male organ care issues that may be creating the itchy male organ situation, either. Granted, some may say that she probably would have included manhood scratching under the category of when the scratch in general, but clearly there is a difference between attending to a slight scratch on the bridge of the nose and providing blessed relief to a devilishly insistent itchy male organ.
As Ms. Post left such a void in the etiquette department, this article intends to help address this issue that all men face occasionally – and some men face almost constantly.